Teachers

Curriculum areas in which MuseumBox can support learning

MuseumBox is a cross curricular tool. It is particularly useful in areas of the curriculum where students have to assess, investigate or debate issues and explore and develop ideas. These areas are outlined below. In addition it provides an excellent opportunity for integrating ICT into the curriculum.

Art and Design KS 2

Exploring and developing ideas

1) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  record from experience and imagination, to select and record from first-hand observation and to explore ideas for different purposes

b. question and make thoughtful observations about starting points and select ideas to use in their work

c. collect visual and other information [for example, images, materials]to help them develop their ideas, including using a sketchbook.

Art and Design KS 3

Exploring and developing ideas

1) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  record and analyse first-hand observations, to select from experience and imagination and to explore ideas for different purposes and audiences

b. discuss and question critically, and select from a range of visual and other information [for example, exhibitions, interviews with practitioners, CDROMs]to help them develop ideas for independent work

c. organise and present this information in different ways, including using a sketchbook. </li>

Careers education - non statutory guidelines KS3

By the age of 14, young people should have acquired the knowledge, understanding and skills to:

1) undertake a realistic self-assessment of their achievements, qualities, aptitudes and abilities and present this in an appropriate format

  • reviewing achievements, skills and qualities
  • producing a personal advertisement or statement

4) recognise stereotyped and misrepresented images of people, careers and work and how their own views of these issues affect their decision-making

  • collecting and analysing images of people in work
  • debating views on 'men's jobs' and 'women's jobs'.

5) recognise and respond to the main influences on their attitudes and values in relation to learning, work and equality of opportunity

  • identifying ways to challenge stereotyping

Careers education - non statutory guidelines - KS4

By the age of 16, young people should have acquired the knowledge, understanding and skills to:

4) explain why it is important to develop personal values to combat stereotyping, tackle discrimination in learning and work and suggest ways of doing this

  • completing an in-tray exercise on harassment
  • examining an organisation's equal opportunities policy.

5) use guided self-exploration to recognise and respond appropriately to the main influences on their attitudes, values and behaviour in relation to learning and work

  • identifying and reviewing their responses to influences and pressures such as the media, peers, friends and relatives.

Citizenship non statutory guidelines KS2

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

1) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to talk and write about their opinions, and explain their views, on issues that affect themselves and society

b.  to recognise their worth as individuals by identifying positive things about themselves and their achievements, seeing their mistakes, making amends and setting personal goals

c.  to face new challenges positively by collecting information, looking for help, making responsible choices, and taking action

Preparing to play an active role as citizens

2) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events

b.  why and how rules and laws are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and how to take part in making and changing rules

c.  to realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours, such as bullying and racism, on individuals and communities

j.  that resources can be allocated in different ways and that these economic     choices affect individuals, communities and the sustainability of the environment

Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle

3) Pupils should be taught:

a.  what makes a healthy lifestyle, including the benefits of exercise and healthy eating, what affects mental health, and how to make informed choices

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

4) Pupils should be taught:

b.  to think about the lives of people living in other places and times, and people with different values and customs

d.  to realise the nature and consequences of racism, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviours, and how to respond to them and ask for help

e.  to recognise and challenge stereotypes

Citizenship programme of study KS3

Developing skills of enquiry and communication

2) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  think about topical political, spiritual, moral, social and cultural issues, problems and events by analysing information and its sources, including ICT-based sources

b.  justify orally and in writing a personal opinion about such issues, problems or events

Citizenship programme of study KS4

Developing skills of enquiry and communication

2) Students should be taught to:

a.  research a topical political, spiritual, moral, social or cultural issue, problem or event by analysing information from different sources, including ICT-based sources, showing an awareness of the use and abuse of statistics

b.  express, justify and defend orally and in writing a personal opinion about such issues, problems or events

English KS2

Speaking and listening

1) To speak with confidence in a range of contexts, adapting their speech for a range of purposes and audiences, pupils should be taught to:

a.  use vocabulary and syntax that enables them to communicate more complex meanings

b.  gain and maintain the interest and response of different audiences [for example, by exaggeration, humour, varying pace and using persuasive language to achieve particular effects]

c.  choose material that is relevant to the topic and to the listeners

d.  show clear shape and organisation with an introduction and an ending

e.  speak audibly and clearly, using spoken  standard English  in formal contexts

f.  evaluate their speech and reflect on how it varies.

8) The range should include:

b.  presenting to different audiences

c.  extended speaking for different purposes

Writing

a.  choose form and content to suit a particular purpose [for example, notes to read or organise thinking, plans for action, poetry for pleasure]

9) The range of purposes for writing should include:

a.  to imagine and explore feelings and ideas, focusing on creative uses of language and how to interest the reader

b.  to inform and explain, focusing on the subject matter and how to convey it in sufficient detail for the reader

c.  to persuade, focusing on how arguments and evidence are built up and language used to convince the reader

English KS3

Speaking

1) To speak fluently and appropriately in different contexts, adapting their talk for a range of purposes and audiences, including the more formal, pupils should be taught to:

a.  structure their talk clearly, using markers so that their listeners can follow the line of thought

b.  use illustrations, evidence and anecdote to enrich and explain their ideas

c.  use visual aids and images to enhance communication

7) During the key stage, pupils should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through the following range of activities, contexts and purposes.

Speaking

8) The range of purposes should include:

a.  describing, narrating, explaining, arguing, persuading, entertaining

b.  extended contributions to talk in different contexts and groups

c.  presentations to different audiences.

Writing to persuade, argue, advise

  • i. develop logical arguments and cite evidence

j.    use persuasive techniques and rhetorical devices

k.  anticipate reader reaction, counter opposing views and use language to gain attention and sustain interest

Writing to analyse, review, comment

i.  reflect on the nature and significance of the subject matter

j.  form their own view, taking into account a range of evidence and opinions

k.  organise their ideas and information, distinguishing between analysis and comment

English KS4

1) To speak fluently and appropriately in different contexts, adapting their talk for a range of purposes and audiences, including the more formal, students should be taught to:

l.  structure their talk clearly, using markers so that their listeners can follow the line of thought

m.  use illustrations, evidence and anecdote to enrich and explain their ideas

n.  use visual aids and images to enhance communication

7) During the key stage, students should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through the following range of activities, contexts and purposes.

Speaking

8) The range of purposes should include:

a.  describing, narrating, explaining, arguing, persuading, entertaining

b.  extended contributions to talk in different contexts and groups

d.  presentations to different audiences.

Geography KS2

Geographical enquiry and skills

1) In undertaking geographical enquiry, pupils should be taught to:

b.   collect and record evidence [for example, by carrying out a survey of shop functions and showing them on a graph]

c.   analyse evidence and draw conclusions [for example, by comparing population data for two localities]

d.  identify and explain different views that people, including themselves, hold about topical geographical issues [for example, views about plans to build an hotel in an overseas locality]

e.  communicate in ways appropriate to the task and audience [for example, by writing to a newspaper about a local issue, using e-mail to exchange information about the locality with another school].

Geography KS3

1) In undertaking geographical enquiry, pupils should be taught to:

a.  ask geographical questions [for example, 'How and why is this landscape changing?', 'What is the impact of the changes?', 'What do I think about them?']and to identify issues

b.  suggest appropriate sequences of investigation [for example, gathering views and factual evidence about a local issue and using them to reach a conclusion]

c.  collect, record and present evidence [for example, statistical information about countries, data about river channel characteristics]

d.  analyse and evaluate evidence and draw and justify conclusions [for example, analysing statistical data, maps and graphs, evaluating publicity leaflets that give different views about a planning issue]

e.  appreciate how people's values and attitudes [for example, about overseas aid], including their own, affect contemporary social, environmental, economic and political issues, and to clarify and develop their own values and attitudes about such issues

f.  communicate in ways appropriate to the task and audience [for example, by using desktop publishing to produce a leaflet, drawing an annotated sketch map, producing persuasive or discursive writing about a place].

Humanities entitlement KS4

The humanities entitlement area:

  • involves students in exploring the spatial, political, social, economic, environmental and temporal dimensions of human existence and in addressing issues of concern to humanity in the past, present and future

History KS2

Knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past

2) Pupils should be taught:

a.  about characteristic features of the periods and societies studied, including the ideas, beliefs, attitudes and experiences of men, women and children in the past

b.  about the social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity of the societies studied, in Britain and the wider world

c.  to identify and describe reasons for, and results of, historical events, situations, and changes in the periods studied

Historical enquiry

4) Pupils should be taught:

a.  how to find out about the events, people and changes studied from an appropriate range of sources of information, including ICT-based sources [for example, documents, printed sources, CD-ROMS, databases, pictures and photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites]

b.  to ask and answer questions, and to select and record information relevant to the focus of the enquiry

History KS3

Historical enquiry

4) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  identify, select and use a range of appropriate sources of information including oral accounts, documents, printed sources, the media, artefacts, pictures, photographs, music, museums, buildings and sites, and ICT-based sources as a basis for independent historical enquiries

b.  evaluate the sources used, select and record information relevant to the enquiry and reach conclusions.

Organisation and communication

5) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  recall, prioritise and select historical information

c.  communicate their knowledge and understanding of history, using a range of techniques, including spoken language, structured narratives, substantiated explanations and the use of ICT.

ICT KS3

Finding things out

1) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to be systematic in considering the information they need and to discuss how it will be used

b.  how to obtain information well matched to purpose by selecting appropriate sources, using and refining search methods and questioning the plausibility and value of the information found

Exchanging and sharing information

3) Pupils should be taught:

a.  how to interpret information and to reorganise and present it in a variety of forms that are fit for purpose [for example, information about a charitable cause presented in a leaflet for a school fundraising event]

b.  to use a range of ICT tools efficiently to draft, bring together and refine information and create good-quality presentations in a form that is sensitive to the needs of particular audiences and suits the information content

PSHE KS2

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

1) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to talk and write about their opinions, and explain their views, on issues that affect themselves and society

b.  to recognise their worth as individuals by identifying positive things about themselves and their achievements, seeing their mistakes, making amends and setting personal goals

c.  to face new challenges positively by collecting information, looking for help, making responsible choices, and taking action

Preparing to play an active role as citizens

2) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

4) Pupils should be taught:

b.  to think about the lives of people living in other places and times, and people with different values and customs

d.  to recognise and challenge stereotypes

PSHE KS3

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

1) Pupils should be taught:

a.  to reflect on and assess their strengths in relation to personality, work and leisure

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

3) Pupils should be taught:

a.  about the effects of all types of stereotyping, prejudice, bullying, racism and discrimination and how to challenge them assertively

Breadth of study

4) During the key stage, pupils should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through opportunities to:

g.  consider social and moral dilemmas [for example, how the choices they make as consumers affect other people's economies and environments]

PSHE KS4

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities

1) Students should be taught:

a.  to be aware of and assess their personal qualities, skills, achievements and potential, so that they can set personal goals

Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle

2) Students should be taught:

a.  to think about the alternatives and long- and short-term consequences when making decisions about personal health

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

3) Students should be taught:

c.   to challenge offending behaviour, prejudice, bullying, racism and discrimination assertively and take the initiative in giving and receiving support

4) During the key stage, students should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through opportunities to:

g.   consider social and moral dilemmas [for example, young parenthood, genetic engineering, attitudes to the law]

Religious Education Non statutory framework KS2

Learning about religion

1) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  describe the key aspects of religions, especially the people, stories and traditions that influence the beliefs and values of others

b.  describe the variety of practices and ways of life in religions and understand how these stem from, and are closely connected with, beliefs and teachings

c.  identify and begin to describe the similarities and differences within and between religions

Learning from religion

2) Pupils should be taught to:

c.   discuss their own and others' views of religious truth and belief, expressing their own ideas

d.  reflect on ideas of right and wrong and their own and others' responses to them

e.  reflect on sources of inspiration in their own and others' lives.

Religious Education Non statutory framework KS2

Learning about religion

1) Pupils should be taught to:

d.  analyse and compare the evidence and arguments used when considering issues of truth in religion and philosophy

e.  discuss and evaluate how religious beliefs and teachings inform answers to ultimate questions and ethical issues

Learning from religion

2) Pupils should be taught to:

a.  reflect on the relationship between beliefs, teachings and ultimate questions, communicating their own ideas and using reasoned arguments

d.   reflect and evaluate their own and others' beliefs about world issues such as peace and conflict, wealth and poverty and the importance of the environment, communicating their own ideas

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